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Course Descriptions

Leona and Peggy with statue

ACCT 100 Introduction to Financial Accounting
3 credits
In this course students will be introduced to the basic concepts and activities of accounting including generally accepted accounting principles, the meaning and purpose of accounting, reading financial statements, Double entry accounting, journalizing the accounting cycle, business forms, reversing entries, merchandising, taxes, depreciation, and payroll.

ACCT 200 The First Nations Accounting Environment
3 credits
Having covered basic accounting principles in an introductory course, students will examine procedures and applications relevant to accounting for monies received from government sources under Treaty and fiduciary arrangements. They will analyze the accounting systems in place in local organizations, including a field experience component. Other topics include the budget cycle, federal funding agent reporting requirements, etc.

ANTH 100 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology
3 credits
This course is a general introduction to the study of cultural anthropology. Such studies are introduced using the unique perspective of cultural relativism. From this perspective we strive to learn and understand other cultures based on the others’ values and beliefs. Attention is given to social inequality and social diversity throughout the course. Topics are: part 1 – anthropology, culture, and methods; part 2 – economic and demographic foundations; part 3 – social organization; part 4 – symbolic systems; and part 5 – contemporary cultural change.

ANTH 200 Race and Racism in Canada
3 credits
This course is designed to introduce students to the dynamics of inequality in Canada. The subject matter encompasses the social science of race, aboriginal and ethnic relations. Following the course content, students will be introduced to the perspectives “explaining” inequality: its patterns and politics. A thorough consideration of diversity in Canada, and the potentials for society building, or “engaging diversity” is explored.

ANTH 300 Gender, Age and Culture
3 credits
This course is an introduction to cross-cultural perspectives regarding age and gender. How does culture construct, and how do people make sense of sex, gender, and age?

ANTH 1100, with case studies and perspectives from the ethnographic record around the earth, and with theoretical considerations of both gerontological and feminist anthropology, addresses the issues and research in the cross-cultural study of women, and of aging.

ANTH 310 First Nations of Canada
3 credits
This course in an ethnographic overview of the diversity and scope of Native Peoples of Canada: the Inuit, Indian, and Metis. Primarily a Consideration of culture areas, the course describes traditional lifeways of the original peoples of the arctic, the eastern and western subarctic, the plains, the eastern woodlands, the BC interior, and the Northwest coast. An introduction to the anthropological and historical scholarships that affects the study of aboriginal peoples, contemporary and historical issues of land claims and self-government are also considered.

ANTH 320 Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
3 credits
This course is a general introduction to the study of anthropological linguistics. The first half of this course dives into the description of language: phonetics, the study of sound; morphology, the study of words; and their patterns, or syntax. The second half of the course introduces language history, and many perspectives on language and the structure of society, on language and meaning, and on language and culture.

ART 101 Survey Studio
3 credits
This course is designed around a wholistic view of self-directed learning/teaching concepts based within ceremony. Each week students will explore a variety of mediums through various project goals.

ART 104 Art & Language
3 credits
This course is designed for beginner language learners to explore language through a variety of art disciplines that include storytelling, dance, and visual arts. Students will engage in the language through physical activities of Cree yoga, Cree Karate, and Cree hip hop. They will also explore the language through traditional arts and diverse art mediums: ink, paints, printmaking, drawing, experiments on paper and sculpting.

ART 130 Intro to Compositions And Design
3 credits
This introductory course examines elements of design and composition in visual communication. Through self-directed learning/teaching concepts the student will explore a variety of themes through designing, creating and analyzing art works, historical and contemporary, and mass media.

ART 133 Intro to Colour Theory
3 credits
This course introduces students to explore colour theory through diverse mediums and to learn about colour through observation of nature. Students are encouraged to create their own colour theories through experimental projects.

ART 136 Portraits
3 credits
Introduction of painting portraits through a variety of mediums, exploring proportions, values, tones, volume and expressions.

ART 220 Intro to Murals
3 credits
This course introduces students to large scale paintings – murals. Students create one mural, collaborate on another mural project.

ART 235 Advanced Visual Communication
3 credits
In this course students explore concepts of visual communication through a visual journal.

ART 230 Advanced Painting
3 credits
In this advance painting course, students will develop a greater level of conceptual level and skill through painting experiments and projects.

ART 245 Into to Landscape
3 credits
This course aims to introduce the basic techniques and materials of landscape paintings and drawing. Students will participate in exploring nature and expressing observations through a variety of mediums.

ART 302 The Art of Language
3 credits
Students must have some written and oral knowledge of an Indigenous language to explore and engage with a variety of themes and art works.

ART 330 Advanced Oil Painting
3 credits
This course is directed to students to use and explore advance oil paints techniques and projects. Each student will explore a variety of advance themes and experiment with oil paint techniques through self-direct learning. There will be bi-monthly critiques so the student to dialogue and ensure the progression of the student. With the instructor’s support and guidance the student will have a deeper appreciation, knowledge, and skill of oil paints.

ART 410 Student Art Curatorial Course
3 credits
This course is designed so that students explore what it takes to curate an art exhibition. They will have the opportunity to curate small traveling shows that will go to different communities. Students will select art works with a theme, create displays, and will install the art in different venues. Student will curate their own solo art exhibition.

The bear statue

BADM 100 Office Procedures
6 credits
Office procedures in todays world encompass many areas such as: communicating effectively, managing time and resources, using technology, preparing communications, records management, handling financial procedures, planning meetings and conferences, using telecommunications, and much more. This course is designed to give the future office professional all the tools needed to succeed in todays busy world.

BADM 175 Computerized Accounting
3 credits
Using Sage 50 Accounting students will build a company and perform day-to-day accounting operations. This hands on course is designed to show students how to apply their accounting skills in a computerized environment. Prerequisite: ACCT 100

BADM 250 Presentations/Publications in Business
3 credits
Students will use various popular software/online tools to explore the use of presentations and publications in todays busy business environment. This hands on course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to use technology in “real world” scenarios. Prerequisite: ITCP 125

BADM 275 Websites and Graphic Design in Business
3 credits
Websites are an important tool in business as well as logos and other “branding” materials. Students will explore various popular software/online tools that they can use to develop exciting. productive websites, logos, etc. Prerequisite: ITCP 125

BADM 300 Special Projects
6 credits
Using case studies and office simulations students will get a chance to apply the knowledge they have gained to “real world” scenarios. To be completed at the end of the program.

BICM 111 The Chemical Processes of Life
3 credits
This course is an introduction into the basic systems of molecules and chemical reactions of life. By using the language and principles of chemistry, biology will be explained at the molecular level. Concepts of biochemistry among plants, molecules, animals and humans will be explored to demonstrate patterns and shared relationships. Indigenous science knowledge will be woven throughout to emphasize context and designs that complete the web of life

BIO 200 Introductory Biology
3 credits
This course is an introduction to the scientific understanding of living organisms. A review of the chemical basis of life provides the foundation for studying cellular internal organization and functions, including energy conversions, selective permeability of membranes, and transmission, use, regulations and manipulation of hereditary information. The origins of life, processes involved in evolution and speciation, and primate evolution, are discussed. Enrichment through comparison with Indigenous understanding of the world is encouraged.

BIOL 300 The Basics of Life
3 credits
This course is designed to introduce and expand on the scientific theories and facts that explain the basis of life and relationships between living organisms. The area of molecular genetics, gene regulation, biotechnology, evolutionary history, the unity and diversity of life and their environments will be explored and demonstrated. Plant biology, animal physiology, defense and immune processes will be examined. Elders and Indigenous knowledge keepers will be invited to share Indigenous world views of the balance and purpose of life to support class discussions and explorations.

Veiled statues

COMM 100 Communication
3 credits
This course emphasizes practical writing skills at the College level by developing skills in grammar and writing techniques. The course enhances the student’s ability to reason, speak and write effectively. Completion of this course enables the student to successfully complete College-level papers and communication with other professionals.

COMM 200/ICS 100 Interpersonal Communications
3 credits
This two part course introduces students to more effective ways of communicating with significant others (co-workers, family members, etc…). In part 1, which emphasizes self-exploration and self change, students will learn how their present style of communication inhibits the communication process while also learning more effective communication strategies. In part 2, which emphasizes generic interviewing skills, students will learn each of the components associated with the interview process by reading about the skill, seeing a model of the skill in action, practicing the skill, generalizing the concepts of the training sessions in their daily interactions.

COMM 300 Counseling: A General Perspective
3 credits
Based on the concepts of “cultural intentionality”, this course, while presenting an overview of the counseling process, emphasizes the acquisitions of skills that will help clients, “re-story” their outdated stories. This re-storying process facilitates emotional insights while promoting growth in the client ways of thinking, feeling and behaving. As the course progresses, students will also experience exercises and skill practice ideas that enhance understandings of self while also contributing to the development of their emotional intelligence.

COMP 125 Introduction to Computer Applications
3 credits
This hands-on course gives students a solid beginning in computer applications. It is designed to provide a working knowledge of today’s common productivity software. The focus of the course will be on: basic terminology, using a windows operating system, keyboarding, Internet Explorer and Google Chrome as research tools, e-mail, using word processing software, spreadsheet software, and presentation software.

COMP 300 Computers in Business
3 credits
This hands-on course is designed to give students a working knowledge of some of today’s common multimedia and design software as well as provide an understanding of digital technologies as they are used in business.  Students completing the course will have used publishing software to create posters, business cards, post cards, etc. Students will also use web page creation tools to create and publish a web site and an online blog.  As well, students will use presentation and other software tools to create interactive presentations and look at a variety of online tools to enhance business communication.
Prerequisite: COMP 125, or equavalent

COMP 325 Advanced use of Productivity Software
3 credits
This course is designed to give students hands-on experience using computer applications and relevant technology as it pertains to today’s world. Focus of the course will be on the integration of technology for the purpose of document production, problem solving, and communication utilizing common word processing software, spreadsheet software, and database software at an intermediate to advanced level.
Prerequisite: COMP 300

CREE 100 Introductory Cree
6 credits
Students will be able to speak and understand simple sentences in Cree using the communicative approach. Students will be able to increase cultural awareness of historical and contemporary lifestyles of Cree speaking peoples. Students will be able to make the Cree language an integral part of their general education by mastering the Cree syllabics and the Roman Orthography. This introductory Cree course serves as an introduction into Plains Cree (Y) dialect, emphasizing the communicative method of learning to speak and understand the Cree language. Students will be exposed to a variety of Cree cultural experiences and spiritual beliefs through active participation in ceremonies and various other activities.

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ECD 100/ID 100 Family Dynamics
3 credits
This course, a systematic view of the family, explores the shifting of family relationships as family members adjust to the demands associated with various phases of the family cycle. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to the unique needs of Indigenous families in the context of the historical trauma and the contemporary legacy of intergenerational trauma. By connecting course material to their own experience of the extended family system, students will gain a better understanding of how family members adjust their boundaries, their emotional connections and their roles as new members are added or as losses take their toll on the family unit. Finally, the impact of violence, remarriage, divorce, death, and chronic poverty on the family will also be explored.

ECD 105 Developing Child
3 credits
Children advance through stages in their growth. This introductory course briefly examines the theories, principals and research into child development. The course will examine physiological, sociological and psychological theories can be applied in the day care. Emphasis will be placed on providing the students the tools to increase the self esteem of the children in their care.

ECD 107 Child Guidance
3 credits
This two part course introduces students to more effective ways of communicating. In part 1, which emphasizes self exploration and self change, students will learn how their present style of communication evolved in the context of their family of origin which may reflect either a closed or open family system. As such students will learn how closed family systems inhibit the nurturing style of communication. Part 2, utilizing a problem solving child-centered philosophy, emphasizes the acquisition of skills that encourage children to interact more effectively with each other while also being accountable for their behaviors.

ECD 110 Special Needs
3 credits
Many children in our communities are challenged with disability to learn. This course will explore a variety of special needs and discuss the awareness, the causes, the treatment and the methods of working with the challenged child. Special needs such as Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, Dyslexia, Depression and Mental Illness will be explored.

ECD 111 Traditional Programs
6 credits
Our elders have a wealth of information that can be passed on to ECD students. The elders will discuss the importance of the language and activities in maintaining our Cree/Dene culture. Students will be introduced to language, traditional teachings, ceremonies, activities, songs and stories that they will be able to use in day care program development upon graduation.

ECD 112 Practicum 1
4 credits
Experiential learning is vital to ensure the students are able to apply the information they obtain on class. Students will be placed in day cares, schools and other appropriate agencies to apply the knowledge they have learned in the classroom and to learn from professional staff.

ECD 113 Integration 1
1 credit
Students have the opportunity to discuss their practicums and to work together to overcome the difficulties and to celebrate the success of their venture into the working world. Areas such as application of regulations, behavior management and communication will be discussed. Resume preparation and career planning will also be reviewed.

ECD 114 Learning Through Play
3 credits
Children learn a tremendous number of skills through play. Students learn different activities they can use with children to facilitate the learning process and encourage wellness and enforce physical and psychological development.

ECD 115 First Aid / CPR
3 credits
It is vital that all day care workers have the knowledge and training to deal with medical emergencies in their employment. Students will be required to successfully complete accredited First Aid and Infant CPR courses applicable to employment.

ECD 116 Preschool Programming
3 credits
Students will be introduced to the planning, development and implementation of preschool programs. Programs will be explored that are designed to foster creativity and learning in children and will explore areas such as art, drama, music and nature. The programming will incorporate culturally-sensitive material and students will be required to develop and apply their programs and evaluate their effectiveness.

ECD 117 Addressing the Whole Child
3 credits
This course will examine safety, nutrition and health issues from a native perspective. Students will be introduced to issues that influence child development in First Nations and will examine what steps can be taken to assess and prevent child injury and disease through proper nutrition and proactive intervention. Taking into account the needs of individual students and communities the above courses will be adapted to fit their needs. Different communities have different needs and this program is designed to be flexible and adapt to the needs of the community, the students and their families.

ECD 200 Team Building: Family and Community Connections
3 credits
Each person has been profoundly influenced by the family and community to which she/he belongs. To be an effective support and resource to parents, caregivers and teachers need to understand themselves and the families/communities they serve. This course will provide students opportunities to learn about their own growth and development, cause of dysfunction in families and ways to extend community connectedness to families in need.

ECD 201 Leadership Behavior
3 credits
Students will learn about different leadership styles, the roles and responsibilities of leaders and the skills that exceptional leaders have demonstrated to accomplish their organizational goals. First Nations perspectives on leadership behavior will be presented. In working with children and their families, collaborative and teamwork approaches have shown the best results and so these will be studied closely. Students will be encouraged to articulate their own philosophy of Early Childhood education and connect it to best practices in childcare settings. This course and ECD 217 are two sides of the same coin and, therefore, have many of the same topics. Tasks and assignments will be cross reference and used to provide practical applications.

ECD 205 Developing Child
3 credits
This course is a continuation of ECD 105. Key areas in developmental psychology will be studied in depth. This focus will be on linking theoretical knowledge and information to everyday best practices for children and birth through 12 years. The emphasis will be on finding the most current issues, concerns and implications in the Early Childhood field and relating those to First Nations situations.

ECD 210 Guiding Exceptional Child
3 credits
This course is a continuation of ECD 110. Students will focus on the most common exceptionalities like ADHD and FAS/E and Behavioral Disorders that children present with in regular Early Childhood settings. Students will learn how to observe and record behaviors, how to report to and support parents appropriately and how to guide them in seeking assistance. The bulk work will focus on how to adapt the environment, the programming and adult behaviors so that children with very challenging behaviors can be integrated successfully.

ECD 211 Traditional Programming
3 credits
In this course students will strengthen their knowledge of Cree/Dene language and culture by using the Methodology Approach. This is a teaching technique that consists of engaging children in active language learning situations: learning through play. Comprehensive vocabulary and dialogues will be planned for themes of interest to young children. There will be balance between adults learning from Elders, and the making of teaching aids for use in ECD group settings.

ECD 212 Practicum 2
4 credits
Experiential leaning is vital to ensure the students are able to apply the information they obtain in class. Students will be placed in day cares, schools and other appropriate agencies to apply the knowledge they have learned in the classroom and from the professional staff.

ECD 213 Integration 2
1 credit
Students have the opportunity to discuss their practicums and to work together to overcome the difficulties and to celebrate the successes of their venture into the working world. Areas such as application of regulations, behavior management and communication will be discussed. Resume preparation and career planning will also be reviewed.

ECD 214 Math, Science and Social Studies
3 credits
From birth young mind are learning the concepts and skills which adults later identify as Math, Science and Social Studies. Caregivers will plan and make curriculum materials and activities that will support children’s cognitive development in such areas, as patterning, sorting, classification, seriation, number, temporal and spatial concepts, and in the acquisition of knowledge, skills and attitudes related of these subjects.

ECD 215 Language, Literature and Literacy
3 credits
This course will provide and in depth look at how children learn language, communication, and cognitive skills. Particular attention will be paid to current methodologies used by speech language pathologists to assist children who have speech problems. Strategies for developing and enriching children’s language will be practiced. Curriculum material will be explored and made. The early stage of emerging reading and writing will be presented. The focus will be on offering young children the integrated learning through play opportunities so crucial to later formal academic learning.

ECD 216 The Creative Child
3 credits
Young children develop their creativity predicable sequence. In this course adults will learn to facilitate this development by providing the environment, materials and time to enhance a child’s individuality, self-esteem and self-confidence. Adults will learn hoe to foster the child’s unique self-expression in all creative experiences afforded by art, music, dramatic play and movement.

ECD 217 ECD Administration
3 credits
This course and ECD 201 are two sides of the same coin. Students will integrate their knowledge, skills and attitudes gained in the other courses to prepare a comprehensive Service Plan and Licensing Application for a Daycare Center. The requirements for this task are contained in the Alberta Family and Social Services documents: Guidelines for obtaining a day care facility license, and Guide to developing a service plan. Students will be working closely from the Day Care licensing Policy Manual.

ECD 218 Introduction to School Age Programs
3 credits
In this course programming for children in Out of School Care will be developed. Issues and concerns related to the 6 to 12 year olds will be discussed. Practices, policies and guidelines available for the City of Edmonton will be used as a basis (it is the most comprehensive guide available and it is updated regularly). However, the Cree Language and culture will be focused on in every session.

ECD 312 Practicum 3
4 credits
As required for Daycare Level 3 certification, students will be doing 200 hours of work in Early Childhood settings. They will 15 hours of debriefing in the Integration Seminars. For those students who have engaged in part time studies and are employed in settings working directly with young children, supervised worksite practicum can be arranged. A detailed daily planning journal, Resource File and Portfolio will form the basis of the Supervisor’s evaluation. Plus, at least three detailed on the job evaluations must be assessed before credit for competence can be awarded.

ECD 313 Integration 3
1 credit
Students have the opportunity to discuss their practicums and to work together to overcome the difficulties and to celebrate the successes of their venture into the working world. Areas such as application of regulations, behavior management and communication will be discussed. Resume preparation and career planning will also be reviewed.

ECD 412 Practicum 4
4 credits
As required for Daycare level 3 certification, students will be doing 200 hours of work in Early Childhood settings. They will do 15 hours of debriefing in the Integration Seminars. For those students who have engaged in part time studies and are employed in settings working directly with young children, supervised worksite practicum can be arranged. A detailed daily planning journal, Resource File and Portfolio will form the basis of the Supervisor’s evaluation. Plus, at least three detailed on the job evaluations must be assessed before credit for competence can be awarded. For students who have received 75% or more in previous practicum and who have experience working directly with children in Early Childhood settings, there may be an option to do Practicum 4in a “Homevisitor” program (INVESTINKINDS) currently being designed in this program.

ECD 413 Integration 4
1 credit
Students have the opportunity to discuss their practicums and to work together to overcome the difficulties and to celebrate the successes of their venture into the working world. Areas such as application of regulations, behavior management and communication will be discussed. Resume preparation and career planning will also be reviewed.

ECON 100 Community Economics
3 credits
This is an introductory course in community economics and development. Primary emphasis will be placed on familiarizing students with the language and concepts associated with market economics and its relationship to community development. Rather than focus strictly on capitalist theory and objectives, this course will also offer students some alternative views and systems for their consideration. Given socio-economic impacts of globalization on local communities, this course will also make students aware of social and political dimensions of international trade and the effects of multinational corporate behavior on individuals, communities, and the environment. The intention is to promote critical analysis of the economic life students live in with the view towards challenging them to think about measures they might use to promote a culturally and environmentally sustainable form of economic organization.

ECON 300 Model Economics
3 credits
In this course students will examine alternative models to establishing economic structures within the community including cooperatives, bartering systems, multi-cultural approaches and philosophies of economic relations. Examples will be drawn from First Nations communities, Mondragon, and Mauritius. This course will be offered in the third of fourth year of the degree program, and linked with the Business Development Co-op course.

ENG 100 Critical Readings and Writing: Prose Forms
3 credits
This is a three-credit course which aims to develop students’ appreciation of literature, to expand their critical thinking skills, and to give them practice in effective essay writing. The text cover mainly nineteenth and twentieth century works; half of these are by Native writers. English 100 examines short stories, essays, and novels; about forty percent of class time is given to instruction in writing.

ENG 110 Critical Readings and Writings: Plays & Poetry
3 credits
English 110 is a three-credit course which aims to develop students’ appreciation of literature, to expand their critical thinking skills, and to give them practice in effective essay writing. The text cover mainly nineteenth and twentieth century works; half of these are by Native writers. ENG 110 examines plays and poetry. About one third of class time is given to instruction in writing, including doing research.

ENG 200 Reading and Writing Skills
3 credits
The major objective of this course is to help students improve their reading and writing ability to a capacity to whereby they can write effectively in a business context. As students progress through this course their writing skills will improve, they will increase their vocabulary, and improve the reading comprehension. In addition, students will pay attention to sentence, paragraph and essay structure and students will be guided through a systematic grammar review.

ENG 210 Business Communication
3 credits
This course deals primarily with written and oral communication in a business context. In addition to continuing review of grammar and vocabulary, the philosophy of communication will be addressed early in the semester. A writing model will be introduced, which will assist the student in writing all form of business correspondence, from letters and memoranda and to proposals, summaries and reports. Communication with colleagues, community members and government agencies will be discussed, in both a written and oral context.

ENG 275 Introduction to Essay Writing
3 credits
This is a university level essay writing course, is designed to teach students a systematic approach to writing essays. By carefully reading the essays of established authors, students discover how a clear sense of audience and purpose dictates the rhetorical strategies utilized by these writers. Through the study of these strategies, students learn that good writers adapt diction, detail, emphasis, content, tone, and style to suit both audience and purpose. Having gained an appreciation of this adaptation process, students will be expected to apply this knowledge to their own writing style. To enhance their writing style, students will also review varied sentence patterns, concise sentences, forceful sentences, effective paragraphs, and other strategies associated with effective editing and revision.

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FAM 300 The Family Life Cycle
3 credits
This course, a systematic view of the family, explores the shifting landscape of family relationships as family members adjust to each phase of life cycle. Throughout the course, particular attention will be paid to the unique needs of aboriginal families relative to each of the life cycle phases. By connecting theory to their own family experience, students will gain a better understanding of how family members adjust their boundaries, their emotional connections and their roles as new members are added or as losses take their toll on the family unit. Additionally, the impact of violence, remarriage, divorce, death, poverty, chronic illness and other environmental factors on the family will also be explored.
Prerequisite: ENG 200

FAM 350 Family Relationship Development
3 credits
This course explores the nature of intimate relationships from a family systems perspective as well as a psychological perspective. The family systems perspective provides students with a better understanding of the varied relationship patterns (triangles, cut-off, conflict, etc.) that couples/families inherit as relationship templates from prior generations, as well as the process of changing these patterns. Additionally, due to the variety of stresses families are forced to cope with addictions, divorce, souse and child abuse, etc., this course also explores the impact of trauma and addiction on intimate relationships, the healing process that helps transforms victims into survivors which is (a perquisite to healthier relationships), and the nature of healthy intimate relationships.

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HLTH 301 Alternative Therapies-Health and Healing in the 21st Century
3 credits
This course is an examination of diverse models and paradigms of nutritional wellness and healing. A review of alternative and wholistic practices will emphasize the research and critical thinking that support healthy lifestyles. A combination of theoretical, practical, and experiential dialogue and Oral Tradition.

HLTH 401 Natural Foods and Nutritional Healing
3 credits
This course will build on the Oral Traditional Cree diet. Research presented on the natural food industry, organic foods, vegetable gardening, the gathering , the preparation, production & distribution of food will be examined. Environmental medicine, Healing, & disease will be presented, researched and evaluated. As a practical application of course material, students will participate in supervised cleansing treatments and specialized diets to improve their personal health and well being. The benefit, challenges and applications of nutritional therapies and nutritional supplementation will be explored. Specific attention will be given to the Traditional Cree Spiritual teachings on food, ceremony and community and it will guide the student’s learning throughout the course.

HLTH 403 Environmental Health and Healing
3 credits
This course addresses issues that involve the earth, our relationship with it, and the health we experience as a result. It will introduce the Gaia / Indigenous philosophy / world view of the natural world (Mother Earth) as a whole, organized, interrelated and self regulating “super organism”. Research will be presented to discuss the concept of a “deep ecology” and its relevance to Indigenous Natural Law. The general environmental health effects of pollution (air, water, soil, food, electromagnetic stress, etc.) on our immune system will be considered, and species extinction, climate change and bio-technology will be evaluated. The wholistic perspective will include the environment, and the interface between the individual and the environment as living dynamic components having both positive and negative impacts.

HLTH 410 Women’s Health Matters
3 credits
This course is an explanation of women’s health issues balanced by traditional Cree knowledge. Topics will include common pathologies and their contributing factors, prevention, and the dynamics of physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual.

HLTH 430 kiskinohamakewina (Teachings)
3 credits
This course is a course about “Showing Knowledge and a Coming to Know” – it’s a journey, a process, – that encompasses community, spirituality, ceremony, a way of thinking, knowing and living. Indigenous Science is an orientation and deep connections to our relationships with the Land, the Cosmos and All Living Things. It is this ethical participation with nature, the land and each other that forms the framework and context of kiskinohamakewina. The theory, philosophy and knowledge shared and reflected in this course will be primarily from the Cree, Dene and Blackfoot traditions but will also give mention to our relatives from the south. This course will build on active participation in the circle and will include local knowledge contributions through Elders, story keepers, healers and knowledge holders from the community, honoring the Oral Tradition.

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ICS 100/COMM 200 Interpersonal Communications
3 credits
This course introduces students to more effective ways of communicating with significant others (co-workers, family members, etc…). In Part 1, which emphasizes self-exploration and self-change, students will learn how their present style of communication inhibits the communication process while also learning more effective communication strategies. In Part 2, which emphasizes generic interviewing skills, students will learn each of the components associated with the interview process by reading about the skill, seeing a model of the skill in action, practicing the skill, and generalizing the concepts of the training sessions in their daily interactions.

IKM 100-a Mentorship 1+Lab
IKM 100-b Mentorship 2+Lab
IKM 100-c Mentorship 3+Lab
IKM 100-d Mentorship 4+Lab
3 credits
The mentorship courses are research-based courses. The learner & the mentor will develop & implement general & specific learning objectives for implementation with the program coordinator. The learning objectives will reflect the mentor/learner relationship, as well as the overall objectives identified by the mentor & learner.

ISL 100/200 Independent Studies
3 credits
This course is designed to allow students the opportunity to pursue studies in an area of personal interest. Students can choose from a series of short workshops or design their own in-depth research project related to leadership& management within the Aboriginal community. This Course promotes self-directed learning.

ITCP 125 Introduction to Computers
6 credits
This is an interactive course that allows students a solid beginning in computer technology & best practices employed in the IT industry. It is designed to prepare the students to sit the CompTia IT Fundamentals certification exam. The use of online video materials to supplement the main text for the course will enhance the delivery of the course content.

ITCP 205 Introduction to Programming
3 credits
This course will introduce students to the concepts of problem-solving & computer programming. Topics include the program development life cycle, developing algorithms (using flow charts & pseudocode), control structures, top-down development & modular design, functions, strings, arrays & structures. We will also features an introduction to procedural programming using a modern programming language, such as C++. The structure & operation of a computer will also be discussed.

ITCP 215 Fundamentals of Databases
3 credits
This course introduces and defines the terminology, concepts, and skills you need to understand database objects, security requirements, graphical tools, T-SQL scripts, and writing database queries, in addition to executing stored procedures. The course is designed to help students seeking to learn the fundamentals of relational databases, database management systems, and database components. (It will also help students to prepare for Exam 98-364, part of the Microsoft Technology Associate (MTA) certification.)

ITCP 250 Upgrade & Repair of PC’s + Networking
6 credits
This course will give students a hands on introduction to the repair and preventative maintenance of personal computers. The focus of this intensive training program will help to prepare student for the computer based A+ exam by providing them with the knowledge and tools necessary to configure, install, diagnose, repair, upgrade and maintain computers and associated technologies.

ITCP 255 Website Design and Implementation
3 credits
This course covers the fundamentals of Internet programming and website design and development. Topics covered include the principles governing the proper design of websites, HTML, client-side scripts and other authoring tools.

ITCP 325 Advanced Use of Productivity Software & OS
6 credits
This advance course is designed to give students hands on experience on how to use and support computer applications and relevant technology as it pertains to today’s world. Focus of the course will be on the integration of technology for the purpose of document production, problem solving, and communication utilizing common word processing, spreadsheet, database and graphic design software.

ITCP 360 Special Projects
6 credits
This course is designed to give students an opportunity to use the knowledge that they have gained over the period of two terms to develop a solution to a problem or an issue that is accruing in their communities that can be solved with Information Technology.

IYIS 100 Beginner’s Cree
3 credits
A course for beginners, presupposing no prior knowledge of Cree; emphasis will be in the oral/aural communicative use of Cree rather than on a knowledge of grammatical terminology and paradigms.

IYIS 101 Cree Identity and World View
3 credits
This course is intended to assist students in gaining a deeper understanding of themselves as members of Cree society by examining contemporary events and issues that affect Native people by individually an collectively. Historical and current influences are discussed in terms of their impact on life style, social structure and the values of Cree Culture.

IYIS 103 Land-based Learning
3 credits
The purpose of this course is to provide opportunities for meaningful dialogue with Cree Elders and helpers into the interconnected significance of land, place, and story. Place-based learning instills an environmental consciousness whereby an understanding of food sovereignty, gathering plants intentionally knowing their medicinal qualities, and embracing wāhkōhtowin by valuing our relationships with the natural world are intended outcomes.

IYIS 105 The Impact of Colonization
3 credits
This course examines historical and contemporary issues influencing the leadership and management environment. Students will come to understand community relationships and structures. The Course analyses leadership and management from general And First Nations perspectives. The content provides the exploration of self-evaluation and critical thinking. Students will examine an develop personal mission statements. In this process, they explore their own vision and perceptions of leadership/management as they strengthen their presentation skills.

IYIS 109 Independent Studies
3 credits
This course is designed to promote students taking ownership of their own language learning process. It is the intention of this course to prepare students to be able to identify process and methods which will enable them to actively direct their language learning journey. Students will identify language related goals and to develop a plan; build language relationships; examine language barriers and evaluate their process and progress.

IYIS 110 Treaties & Governance
3 credits
This introductory course is designed to examine the Treaties from two perspectives; the First Nations’ and Canada (British Crown). The Instructors will provide an overview of definitions, key legislation, policy and legal developments which shape the relationship between Aboriginal and Canadian governments. The primary focus for the discussion will be Treaty 6 (1876). We will examine the events leading up to the negotiation and singing of the treaty, review and discuss the implementation of the treaty and identify areas which require more work .The secondary focus of the course is on First Nation Governance. We will examine this topic from historical a contemporary perspective. We will look at issues of governance, i.e. lands, membership resources and rights inherent to the spirit of intent of Treaty Six and how they are defined by non-First Nation ligation, policy and laws. A special feature of the course is the oral emphasis, in both course delivery and course content. Elders will be invited to participate and provide knowledge and wisdom on treaties and governance. There will be limited reading requirements however, students are expected to provide written assignments on the content of weekly lectures. To achieve maximum results, students are expected to ask questions and seek information on issues of interest or concern to them.

IYIS 111 Language Learning Process
3 credits
This course will challenge students to explore language learning as an individual and personal experience. Students will be expected to examine the barriers that keep them from completing program work and explore solutions to enable success. Students will also explore their responsibility as learners and develop concrete strategies to improving their language acquisition outside of the class. They will also be asked to prepare material to enhance their language learning experiences thereby taking ownership of their language learning journey.

IYIS 114 Methods of Language Acquisition
3 credits
In this introduction to Cree immersion course students will be introduced to language learning with the goal of improving their ability to use the language (speaking, compression. reading and writing). Participants (language learners and helpers) will also explore the process and paradigms which undermine or support the acquisition of language skills in adults. Since all lessons will be provided through participation and interaction, it is critical for students to attend classes daily.

IYIS 115 Cree Language
6 credits
In this innovative seminar style courses, students will be introduced to diverse methods for language acquisition, with the goal of improving their ability to use the language (speaking and comprehension) and launching a long term language learning plan. Participants (language learners and helpers) will also explore the process and paradigms which undermine or support the acquisition of language skills in adults. This will be a process oriented learner directed class balancing individual and collective activities, with an emphasis on oral tradition. Elders and fluent speakers will be language helpers. This course is designed for student with little or no knowledge of the language. The aims are listening comprehension and basic oral expression.

IYIS 116 Intermediate Cree 1
3 credits
This course is essentially oral. Its gal is fluency through conversation, drill storytelling, class presentations and audiotapes. Class will also include the study of grammar, structure, vocabulary, and work formation. This course will be delivered concurrently in the first semester with IYIS 115.

IYIS 117 Intermediate Cree 2
3 credits
This course is a continuation of intermediate Cree 1 in its emphasis on fluency. Oral traditions of storytelling and speech will be featured. The class will be conducted as an immersion class. This course will be delivered concurrently in the second semester with IYIS 115.

IYIS 121 Theory and Practice in Cree Language Immersion
3 credits
This course analyzes the research of Dr. Jim Cummins and others in language loss, first and second language learning, and immersion education. It focuses also on the strategies, experiences and educational results of existing native language immersion programs, particularly those the Hawaiians, Maoris, Navajos, Mohawks, Okanogan’s and Inuit.
Prerequisite; IYIS 115 & IYIS 116

IYIS 122 Cree Literacy and Technology for Language Teaching
3 credits
This literacy course offers a practical introduction to using concepts and techniques of technology in language teaching. Designed to provide an overview of the most widely used types of software and internet-based programs and offers “hands-on” experience using select computer applications to promote literacy usage in schools and communities. No sophisticated computer skills are required. Open to all who want to understand and experience how technology can support Cree language literacy and revitalization efforts.

IYIS 124 Instructional Methods (Immersion Focus)
3 credits
This hands on course will cover the basic methods of teaching Cree. We will explore different methods and approaches for immersion teaching. Teaching second language learners involves much more than an understanding of theory, methods and materials. The course will also address psychological, social and cultural factors that influence students learning the Cree Language.

IYIS 134 Oral History Cree Research Methods
3 credits
The course will focus on current methodologies for planning, gathering, documenting, reporting and presenting community based research. This will foster a greater understanding of the variety of issues and perspectives on traditional land use studies. This is an introductory course on Cree data collection, conducting Cree Interviews, mapping and recording original Cree names, traditional uses, including sites and activities.

IYIS 144 An introduction to nehiyaw pimatisowin research method and methodology: Elders Helper oskiskwew oskapewis atoskan
3 credits
This is an introductory course designed to examine the role of the elder’s helper in a pragmatic experiential setting. The instructors will provide an overview of guidance of definitions, key protocols, and ceremonial roles and responsibilities that are needed to fulfill responsibility of emphasis, in both course delivery an course content (nehiwaywewin). Elders, established fire keepers, pipe keepers and respected oskapewisak will be invited to participate and provide knowledge an wisdom on oskapewis atoskan.

IYIS 200 iyiniw pimatisiwin
6 credits
This is a course about discovery, about ourselves, our culture and our own personal journey in life. As such, we have to be open to the teachings as they appear or present themselves. Students will engage in an guided but independent learning journey, and are expected to participate and explore their own relationship with the Cree way of life including language, ceremony, and traditional activities as a means of developing leadership qualities. At the beginning of each week students will engage in ceremony in the context of exploring culture and language.

IYIS 210 Historical Impacts
3 credits
This course explores the historical roots of the Cree world view and the colonial impacts to the contemporary period. The course reviews the social, economic, and political life of the Cree in a steady state and then the upheaval of these systems through a historical timeline. A special feature of the course is the storytelling richness provided by guest speakers who in facing adversity, recreated their experiences towards a meaningful and purpose filled life. Emphasis in the course is placed on the First Nations healing and wellness strategies and facilitating critical thinking skills, raising consciousness, and eliciting strategies for leadership working with First Nations Families and communities.
Prerequisite: IYIS 105 & IYIS 119 or Instructor’s approval.

IYIS 215 Second Language Acquisition ( Advanced Language Immersion & Materials Development)
6 credits
This course will be an advanced course on oral/immersion teaching with an emphasis on higher level language teaching methods and materials development. The main goal of this course will be to prepare fluent Cree language speakers in planning language- learning lessons/activities, and to develop materials for language-learning activities this course will also address curriculum planning and development and to identify how to assess students Cree language learning.

IYIS 216 Curriculum Development & Research
6 credits
This course will study the theory and application of curriculum development to Indigenous bilingual education with emphasis on community-based models, cooperative/wholistic methods, evaluation and curriculum change. The students will research successful curriculum development efforts and critique bilingual/multicultural children’s literature appropriate for Indigenous classrooms. The process of curriculum development/thematic units will be based upon the identification of the learner/community needs, philosophy of education, theory of learning and rational for language learning in bilingual/dual/immersion classroom. The curriculum process will emphasize the involvement and empower the community, parents, and elders and culture beaters.

IYIS 219 Service Learning
3 credits
Service learning combines informal learning with community service as a way of students giving to the community and informally learning more about a specific area of interest. Volunteerism in language learning activities within the communities will provide students will hands on experience in language revitalization within First Nation communities. It is important that we engage in this type of learning because there is often very few resources for language promotion and worldwide many languages are under threat of extinction and these include Indigenous languages of the Americas.

IYIS 220 Contemporary Issues                                                                                       3 credits
This course will engage individual and collective reflection to the critical examination of their own stances in relation to the complexity of issues present in current day society. Using the process of community building , students will assess their own individual assets, those of others, individually and organizationally, to incorporate and support an action oriented, pro active approach to change. Prerequisite: IYIS 210

IYIS 222 Advanced Cree Literacy and Technology for Language Teaching
3 credits
This literacy course offers a practical introduction to using concepts and techniques of technology in language teaching. Designed to provide an overview of the most widely used types of software and internet-based programs and offers ‘hands-on” experience using select computer applications to promote literacy usage in schools and communities. No sophisticated computer skills are required. Open to all who want to understand and experience how technology can support Cree Language literacy and revitalization efforts.

IYIS 244 An Introduction to nehiyaw pimatisowin Research Method and Methodology: iyiwanisisowin; fasting.
3 credits
This course is designed to examine the role of re-search method and methodology within an indigenous learning paradigm. This land based pragmatic experiential course will allow the learner to learn from the land, ceremony and kihtehayah instruction. kihtehayah will provide an overview and guidance of definitions, key protocols, and ceremonial roles and responsibilities that are needed to fulfil responsibility of nehiyaw pimatisowin. A special feature of the course is the oral emphasis, in both course delivery and course content nehiyawewin. kihtehayah, pipe keepers and respected knowledge holders will be invited to participate and provide knowledge and wisdom on iyiwanisisowin; fasting.

IYIS 300 Cultural Camp: Traditional Teachings
3 credits
This land-based opportunity allows learners to experience a variety of helping and healing forums in cultural, ceremonial, art and fine art workshops from local community Elders and leaders. Participants will learn about traditional protocols to seek new learning’s, be talking in circles with Elders to explore the meanings of various ceremonies, may experience pipe ceremonies and a sweatlodge, and will celebrate the gifts and talents of Indigenous entertainers. This is an open invitation to students an community to come together to promote healing and reconciliation through ceremony and celebration.

IYIS 310 A Historical Overview of Native Education in Canada
3 credits
IYIS is an historical examination of the formal education provided to Indian, Metis, and Inut peoples with special attention to aboriginal , missionary, federal, and provincial education programs. This is a seminar course. This is, readings are required before class, that together we debrief and discuss the contents of the course. In addition to participating in class discussion, students will be expected to contribute to the learning experience through formal group and individual presentations of the readings. Guest speakers will also be invited to our class to stimulate dialogue.

IYIS 315 Second Language Acquisition (Advanced Language Immersion & Materials Development)
6 credits
This course is an advanced course on oral/immersion teaching with emphasis on higher-level language teaching methods and materials development. The main goal of this course will be to prepare fluent Cree language speakers in planning language-learning lesson/activities, practice/demonstrate language-learning activities and to develop materials for language-learning activities. This course will also address curriculum planning and development and to identify how to assess students’ Cree language learning. This is a practical and hands on course.

IYIS 317 practicum-kakocî-sîsâwe-kîskînwahamâke
3 credits
This practicum provides students with opportunities to synthesize and demonstrate their newly acquired knowledge and skills through designing and implementing one (mock) week of Cree Culture and Language education during the course of extended expectations in warm weather. Instructors will spend their time advising, critiquing, and evaluating candidates.

IYIS 334 Community Language Revitalization
6 credits
This course will examine various community revitalizations strategies strengthening students’ understanding of the complex context and characteristics of language loss, maintenance, and recovery. Through practical activities students will develop an understanding of strategies for language revitalization within communities. Students will examine the realities and needs of their home communities, and identify strategies for both language revitalization activities and for further education, linguistics, or other related areas.

IYIS 336 Community Language Revitalization A Study Tour – A Maori Perspective
3 credits
The course will challenge students to broaden their perspective of language and cultural revitalization by seeing how other Indigenous peoples in particular the Maori address the challenges regarding language retention and cultural autonomy. This tour also creates an opportunity to forge relationships with the Maori people who face many of the same language difficulties we experience in our communities. Students will have an opportunity to share their own cultural knowledge and language.

IYIS 400 Leadership Paradigms
3 credits
The Indigenous Leadership Paradigms course, partially conducted in Cree, is designed to impart the Cree traditional leadership perspective. Qualities of leaders, how they were chosen, and how they lead in the past and in the present will be discussed. Current day leaders will be invited as guest speakers and students will have the opportunity to dialogue and discover their own leadership paradigm.
Prerequisite: L&M Diploma or Coordinator’s approval.

IYIS 403 Selected Topics in Native Studies: The Evolution of Indigenous Educational Leadership in Canada For Teachers in Contemporary Times
3 credits
The purpose of this course is to help students understand, analyse and synthesize Indigenous educational leadership in the context of a historical/contemporary examination of formal education for Canada’s Indigenous People’s. Contemporary school leadership has not operated in isolation, but has been part of an evolutionary process. This course will demonstrate this process, while giving students skills that incorporate elements of traditional Indigenous leadership. The goal of this course is to provide students with diverse readings and seminar discussion/dialogue opportunities that will enable them to examine educational experiences of Indigenous children in the formal educational context. Special attention will be given to the historical intention of missionaries, in the current context of federal and provincial educational programs. Lastly our discussions will consider current realities in the evolution of Indigenous educational leadership; examining models from traditional hierarchical institutions to models of servant leadership. Throughout the course, our focus will be on how this evolutionary educational leadership process continues to affect children in classrooms today. Teachers play a significant role in assisting Indigenous children to feel secure in two distinct worlds; the Indigenous and the larger mainstream. The seminar/circle portion of the course will provide students with the opportunity to engage in reflective dialogue on how leadership can and should impact this role. Traditional Indigenous leadership incorporates dialogue, talking circles and time for personal reflection. In this course students will be immersed in such activities, as they learn traditional aspects of leadership as taught and modelled by College Elders.

IYIS 520 Indigenous Research Methodologies
6 credits
This course will explore a range of particular issues surrounding research & Indigenous Peoples, including various frameworks and methodologies, as well as the political, social, economic, and ethical implications of research practices. Through examination of relevant research specific to language acquisition and intensive discussions, students will identify areas of research need specific to Cree language revitalization efforts. This would assist them in identifying question or area of interest for their own specific research project.

IYIS 521 Issues in Second Language Acquisition
3 credits
In this course students will read, critique and discuss articles on the comparison between first and second language learning, differences in child and adult second language learning needs and language teaching methodologies conducive to immersion curriculum. Course will provide a brief overview of the history of language teaching methodologies in addition to examining the efforts of second language approaches specific to polysynthetic languages. The purpose of this course is to provide students with the opportunity to clarity their philosophies regarding second language acquisition.

IYIS 534 Community Language Revitalization A Study Tour – A Maori Perspective
3 credits
The course will challenge students to broaden their perspective of language and cultural revitalization by seeing how other Indigenous peoples in particular the Maori address the challenges regarding language retention and cultural autonomy. This tour also creates an opportunity to forge relationships with the Maori people who face many of the same language difficulties we experience in our communities. Students will also be expected to share presentations of the success and challenges faced by their communities in regards to language revitalization to our Maori hosts.

IYIS 535 Community Language Revitalization
3 credits
In this course will examine various community revitalizations strategies strengthening students understanding of the complex context and characteristics of language loss, maintenance, and recovery. Through practical activities students will develop an understanding of strategies for language revitalization within communities. Students will examine the realities and needs of their home communities, and identify strategies for both language revitalization activities and for further study in education, linguistics, or other related areas.

IYIS 550 Methods in Language Acquisition
3 credits
Reading, research and discussion on advanced topics of language acquisition. These may include existing methodologies, acquiring polysynthetic languages, Cree inflection patterns or Cree morphemes. Students will participate apply specific methodologies in a classroom setting.

IYIS 556 Special Topics in Second Language Acquisition (Literacy and Technology)
3 credits
In this course students can choose to examine either: Existing theory and research related to literacy development in languages with limited written resources or existing theory and research regarding the use of technology in promoting second language acquisition.

IYIS 600 kâwî nehîyâwîtân
3 credits
(oral / written) A seminar throughout the program, combination of structured and independent study, to advance language proficiency in spoken and written Cree. (Classroom/immersion camp)

IYIS 610 Post-Coloniality
3 credits
A course that explores the journey of coming back to what we know. Exploring traditional knowledge and contemporary theory, and experiences of Indigenous peoples in other countries and continents. (Seminar/ Conference)

IYIS 620 Research Methods
3 credits
Exploring and articulationg traditional ways of knowing and coming to knowing: kiskinohamatowin, kiskinohamasowin, kiskinohamakosowin qualitative approaches, decolonizing methodologies, critiquing quantitative methods. (classroom)

IYIS 630 Arts, Science, Creativity
3 credits
As a way of knowing, of expressing wholeness, of discovering self, applying creativity to thinking, leadership, planning, problem solving… (independent study/ conference/ camp)

IYIS 640 Land, Healing, Ceremony, Ethics
3 credits
Our relationship to Creation, how that influences our learning, our paradigms, (Ceremony/ classroom/ independent study/ camp)

IYIS 650 International Studies
3 credits
Independent work with scholars and traditional knowledge holders from other Indigenous peoples, in the student’s area of specialization. (online/ distance/ independent study)

IYIS 660 Mentorship
3 credits
With the scholar/teacher from another institution/community in the students area of specialization.

IYIS 670 Elective
3 credits
In the students area of specialization.

IYIS 690/691/692/693
12 credits
Dissertation/Thesis/Project
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LM 100 The Human Dimension at Work
3 credits
This course covers topics relating to organizing and coordinating employees, approaching the Human Resource Management function with the goal of maintaining a human environment, consistent with an Indigenous world view. Students will practice interviewing skills, emotional intelligence, and consensus building. Potential employees and administrators will acquire skills to facilitate an emotionally supportive workplace, emphasizing effective relationship. Students will explore the human resource management framework with an aboriginal wholeistic approach to understanding the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual dimensions of the human being.

LM 110 Organizational Leadership
3 credits
The course invites students to examine traditional leadership knowledge and experience as well as contemporary leadership to build approaches supporting effective individual and collective behavior in organizations. Students are offered theoretical and experiential learning opportunities to expand their understanding of human behavior. Skills in consensus building and conflict resolution will also be introduced and practiced. A project/ field placement component (12 class hours plus up to 26 additional hours up to 48 total placement/ project hours) provides opportunity for application, observation, refection, and interpretation of the material.

LM 120 Business Law
3 credits
The object of this course is to provide the student with a basic knowledge and understanding of the law in general, and business and administrative law in particular. The course canvasses a wide range of issues and topics all inter-related with contemporary Canadian business law. Students will gain a wealth of historical and practical business law knowledge to assist them in their personal and professional undertakings in the future. The course will introduce students to the various types of business structures that are available and address related issues of liability, business efficacy and financing associated with each. Where and whenever possible, the instructor will provide examples of contemporary First Nations business undertaking and discuss the practicability of engaging in business under one structure or another.

LM 130 The Arts – A Leadership Perspective
3 credits
Our artists express the experience of our communities. Leaders can learn from the ancient and emerging artistic traditions of our people to celebrate and honor the collective cultural experience, and to apply creative skills to leadership responsibilities. Students will explore their own creative talent through visual, literary, and performing arts, guided by professional First Nations artists.

LM 200 Wholistic Leadership
3 credits
This course will help students understand the need for effective leadership to focus on the “whole” person. Consequently, the course will delve into the importance of addressing balance mentally, emotionally, spiritually, and physically. The course will include academic theory and practical hands on experience in examine the four quadrants of wholistic leadership by exploring issues such as nutrition, stress, addiction, disease, and wellness, and analyze the health impacts in our communities. How important is it for students/ leaders in Aboriginal communities to focus on wholistic care in order to help the larger community? This course seeks to stimulate this discussion. In addition to academic theory, the expertise of our resident Elder will be utilized.

LM 210 Organizational Theory & Design
3 credits
These course students will explore various determinations of organizational structure, examine several models, an focus on philosophy of process and relationships of building organizations. Particular emphasis will be placed on Stewardship and Teams as approaches to organizing to accomplish vision and goals. This course will also offer practical skills in team leadership and process which support functional, productive, accountable, organizational relationships.

LM 220 Introductions to Leadership & Management Theory
3 credits
This is an introductory course involving the study of situational and ethical leadership as well as delve into principles affecting leaders attempting to incorporate an ethical approach to leadership.
Prerequisite: LM110

LM 230 Intergovernmental Relations and Negotiations
3 credits
Students will develop an understanding of government structures including; federal, provincial, Treaty, constitutional, and fiduciary responsibilities. They will build negotiation skills using case studies that explore local, regional, national, and international relationships affecting First Nations.

LM 240 Small Business
3 credits
Focuses specifically on business principles and practices relevant to the small business in First Nations communities. Students will be guided through the process of making decisions regarding the design of a business and preparing a business plan, exploring the First Nations entrepreneurial environment.

LM 250 Marketing
3 credits
Marketing is a student-focused course that emphasizes and demonstrates many of the new developments in the area of marketing. Students are encouraged to become active participants in learning about how marketing affects organizations, First Nations people, and themselves. Contemporary Canadian and international examples will help students understand the practical relevance of theoretical applications. Students will be encouraged to develop applications for their communities and themselves.

LM 350 Leadership Projects 1
3 credits
Increasingly, managers are expected to lead training and development and conduct in-service workshops for staff in this course students will build skills in the design, promotion, and delivery of professional development and training workshops. They will review concepts of audience identification, topic selection, research, energizers, learning activities, delivery, feedback, and revision in preparing and delivering two whole day workshops to community organizations or agencies.
Prerequisite: L&M Diploma or Coordinator’s approval.

LM 360 Total Quality Leadership
3 credits
Students will understand the importance of quality in the workplace; either in an office or retail setting. Most Aboriginal organizations are not for profit thus there hasn’t readily been emphasis on quality service. Students will identify elements of quality, an give them an opportunity to practice quality in the workplace.
Prerequisite: L&M Diploma or Coordinator’s approval.

LM 370 Leadership & Change
3 credits
This senior level course delves into change and leadership from a practical approach to organizational redesign. The course analyzes the change management process utilizing a model which takes into account two levels of change; at the strategic level, organization wide and change at the grassroots level. The course identifies the importance of teams, effective communication, organizational culture, and leadership. It identifies instruments of change & importance of goals, performance, feedback/coaching, rewards and recognition in effective organizational design.
Prerequisite: L&M Diploma or Coordinator’s approval.

LM 410 Business Practicum
3 credits
This is a senior course available in the final two years of a degree program. During this full year course students will complete a 450 hour work placement in supervised environment that will allow them to apply and grow skills and knowledge gained in the program.
Prerequisite: L&M Diploma or Coordinator’s approval.

LM 430 Business Development Co-op
3 credits
Students will participate in the set-up of a small business, implementing the co-op and entrepreneurial concepts and models. The practical hands-on experience will provide them with the back round to successfully start up or support small business development within their communities. This course will be offered in the third or fourth year of the degree program, and linked with the Model Economies course.
Prerequisite: L&M Diploma or Coordinator’s approval.

LM 440 Financial Management for Non-Financial Managers
3 credits
This course invites students to develop a basic understanding of the elements of financial management assuming they are not finance majors. Concepts covered include interpreting financial information to support decision making, budgeting and planning, and securing financing for investment and growth.
Prerequisite: L&M Diploma or Coordinator’s approval.

LM 450 Advanced Marketing Issues
3 credits
In this senior course students will explore specialized areas of marketing, which may include a market research project for the Business Development Co-op and an introduction to e-commerce. Other topics may include culture & tourism or consulting projects.
Prerequisite: L&M Diploma or Coordinator’s approval.

LM 470 Policy Planning & Strategy
3 credits
This course is designed to allow students to explore issues around policy development and strategic planning, with an emphasis on public sector organizations with a focus on First Nations perspectives, operating environments, and issues (economic, social, political), students will engage in a group project to review/ critique existing policies and strategies, and/or develop a comprehensive set of policies and plans for the Business Project.
Prerequisite: L&M Diploma or Coordinator’s approval.

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MA 100 Business Mathematics
3 credits
Business Mathematics is an introductory course which is intended to increase the students skill in practical financial and mathematical problems that are present in the business community and to provide background for mathematical topics in finance, accounting, and marketing.

MA 110 Math for Statistics
3 credits
Math 110 is an introductory course in statistics and will focus on some basic concepts dealing with the collection, the representation, and the analysis if statistical data. The course will include some experiences with basic probability theory and a look at how statistical material can be used and misused.

MA 150 An Introduction to Statistics
3 credits
This course is an introduction to basic in descriptive and inferential statistics. The examples presented in class will focus on how statistics is applied in social sciences and in business.

MA 200 Research Methods and Lab
3 credits
This introductory Research Methods course will provide students with an overview to the topics of qualitative and quantitative research concepts and techniques. Students will learn introductory statistical principles and learn to apply these to a community project.
Prerequisite: MA 110 or Instructor’s approval.

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NEHI 114 Immersion: Cree Morphology Perspective 1
6 credits
In this introduction to Cree course students will be introduced to language learning with the goal of improving their ability to use the language (speaking, comprehension). Participants (language learners and helpers) will also explore the processes and paradigms which undermine or support the acquisition of language skills in adults. Primary focus of this course will be on but not limited to the internalizing the inflection patterns of AI and TI verb. Since all lessons will be provided through participation and interaction, it is critical for students to attend classes daily. Course includes a lab.

NEHI 115 Language Acquisition Methodologies
6 credits
This course will introduce students to three methods that will enable them to improve on their language skills independent of the College. The course is designed to give students an opportunity to understand each method to practice in a safe environment and then to begin developing language relationships in the community. Weekly class will be a time to resolve technical difficulties, identify learning barriers and to practice new text.

NEHI 116 Immersion: Cree Morphology Perspective II
6 credits
In this Cree immersion course students will continue to build on their language learning goals of improving their ability to use the language (speaking and comprehension). Participants (language learners and helpers) will continue to expand understanding of verb inflection patterns focusing on TA verbs and moving on to inverse and mixed sets. Since all lessons will be provided through participation and interaction, it is critical for students to attend classes daily. Students are also expected to participate in a lab.

NEHI 117 Immersion: Cree Morphology Perspective III
6 credits
In this Cree immersion course students will continue to build on their language learning goals of improving their ability to use the language (speaking and comprehension). Participants (language learners and helpers) will continue to expand understanding all verb inflection patterns focusing on mixed and inverse sets. All lessons will be provided through participation and interaction; it is critical for students to attend classes daily and will be expected to participate in a lab.

NEHI 118 nâkateyihtetân tânisi nehiyawewin e-isi-wiyomikoyahk (Cree Morphology and Verbs)
6 credits
This course studies the internal structures of words in Cree. It looks closely at the smallest units, which have the ability to change the meaning of the word, and defines the grammatical rules that apply. This course will explore the inflectional, compounding and derivational aspects of Cree Morphology. Pre-requisite NEHI 114, 116 and 117

NEHI 120 Cree Phonology and Syllabics
6 credits
This course is designed to teach students the Cree syllabic system and its origins. They will facilitate the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) that are essential to mastering a language so as to develop literacy in the use of syllabics. Students will master the Cree sounds associated with each syllabic and develop fluidity in their ability to read syllabic texts.

NEHI 122 Cree Literature and Writing (Immersion)
3 credits
This course, conducted entirely in Cree, will survey and analyze published materials in the language focusing on representative samples from early historic documents and liturgical writings, to dictionaries, recorded oral traditions, and more contemporary documents, including children’s literature and curriculum materials. Particular attention will be paid to content, orthographies, grammatical changes and historical and contemporary uses for the texts. Students will also gain experience writing short essays in the Cree language.

NEHI 154 nehiyaw acimowin
6 credits
This introductory course will provide an opportunity to continue practicing their listening and oral skills through storytelling and oration. The primary focus for students is to increase their Cree lexicon by translating books, stories or speeches with the help of fluent speakers. Both fluent and non-fluent speakers of Cree will benefit from speaking publicly on topics that stretch their vocabulary or topic areas that they are not familiar with.

NEHI 177 nikamowin ekwa nehiyawewin
3 credits
In this course students will explore how music can be used to facilitate language learning. Students will experience how music can be a powerful tool for learning new concepts, expanding vocabulary or memorizing information. Student will be offered a unique and exciting opportunity to integrate music with language learning through exposed to various genres from children’s songs to traditional songs. Course work will include analyzing terminology and language usage utilized in a song from each genre.

NEHI 200 Intermediate Cree
6 credits
Students will increase their understand of Cree with the examination of more complex grammatical structures. Students will also work on increasing their ability to speak through oral activities such as conversations and the reading of stories within the classroom setting. Students will also be expected to practice translating to and from Cree and work on individual projects. Exposure to cultural teachings and ceremonies will be part of this course. Prerequisite Cree 100

NEHI 218 Advanced Morphology and Verbs
6 credits
This course studies the morphology of the Cree language and examines the smallest units of meaning, the morphemes. In particular this course will explore the compounding aspect and derivational inflections of Cree words. Students will be expected to acquire original oral texts which they will then be expected to analyze from a morphological perspective. This course will assist students in increasing their Cree lexicon and enhance their ability to speak Cree at a higher level of fluency.

NEHI 240 Cree Literacy, Syllabics and SRO
6 credits
The course will focus on building on student’s literacy skills through the study of both syllabics and Standard Roman Orthography (SRO) in relation to the inflectional patterns of Cree words. In the process Students will explore issues in literacy in relation to the Cree language. The main goal of this course will be to prepare fluent Cree language speakers in planning language-learning lessons/activities, practice/demonstrate language-learning activities, and to develop materials for language-learning activities. Students must demonstrate an ability to read and write fluidly in both SRO and syllabics to the extent of their fluency in the language.

NEHI 261 pîkiskwâtitowin, peyak (Conversational Cree 1)
6 credits
ta-koci-sesâwi-pîkiskwehk, âpatanwa metawewina, pîkiskwâtitowin, waskawewina ekwa kotaka kîkwaya ta-ati-wîcehikocik ta-nisitohtahkik ekwa ta-ati-nehiyawecik. This is a course that is designed to engage the student to use the Cree language in conversations. Games, dialogues, TPR and other similar strategies are employed to engage the student to converse and acquire the necessary conversational skills in Cree.

NEHI 271 ayisînînînak pîkiskwewin, peyak
6 credits
This course continues to build level of fluency in Cree achieved in year one and two of the program through activities where students are challenged to speak publically. These activities include oral address in class, in a public forum, class room debates and role plays. Students will continue to build their mental lexicons in addition to strengthening their understanding of Cree grammar .

NEHI 277 nikamowin ekwa nehiyawewin
3 credits
A continuation of NEHI 177, this course students will continue to explore how music can be used to facilitate language learning. Student will be offered a unique and exciting opportunity to integrate music with language learning through exposed to various genres from children’s songs to traditional songs. Course work will include planning language learning lessons/activities facilitated by music in addition to developing their own simple song/lullaby.

NEHI 361 pîkiskwâtitowin, niso (Conversational Cree 2)
6 credits
ta-koci-sesâwi-pîkiskwehk, âpatanwa metawewina, pîkiskwâtitowin, waskawewina ekwa kotaka kîkwaya ta-ati-wîcehikocik ta-nisitohtahkik nehiyawewin. This course is a continuation of NEHI 261 and is designed to engage the student to use the Cree language in conversations. Games, dialogues, TPR and other similar strategies are employed to engage the student to converse and acquire the necessary conversational skills in Cree. Emphasize will be placed on students strengthening their understanding of Cree sentence structures

NEHI 371 ayisînînînak pîkiskwewin, niso
6 credits
A continuation of NEHI 271, this course continues to build level of fluency in Cree through activities where students are challenged to speak publicly. These activities include oral address in class, in a public forum, class room debates and role plays. Students will continue to build their mental lexicons in addition to strengthening their understanding of Cree grammar.

NEHI 500 Applied Cree Linguistics
3 credits
Reading, research, discussion and writing on topics specific to Cree linguistics. This course introduces students to the key concepts that characterize the different components of language, namely phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics with an emphasize on examining different theoretical concepts used to describe the linguistic structure of language and how these can be applied to the teaching of Cree as a second language.

NEHI 518 Cree Inflectional Morphology
3 credits
Morphology is the description of grammatical forms in a language. As such, this course studies the internal structures of words in Cree. This course will look closely at the inflection aspects of Cree words and the grammatical rules that apply. This course will analyze verb stems, animate and inanimate, transitive and intransitive verbs and additional structural elements including, person, tense, singular, plural, negative and affirmative and indicative, conjunct and imperative forms.

NEHI 522 Methods in Cree Literacy
3 credits
To facilitate at the master’s level literacy in nehiyaw câkipehikanak (Cree syllabics) and gain an understanding of the phonological and grammatical writing systems, which also includes Standard Roman Orthography (SRO), students will read and discuss topics on best practices in developing literacy in the Cree language.

NEHI 528 Cree Morphology – Compounding
3 credits
In this course Students will explore how morphemes are combined to create words paying particular attention to rules that may apply how these morphemes can be combined. Students will participate in discussion with Elders from the community as to the origins and/or meaning of morphemes contained in specific words

NEHI 530 Issues in Cree Literature and Writing
3 credits
This course, conducted entirely in Cree, will survey and analyze published materials in the language focusing on representative samples from early historic documents and liturgical writings, to dictionaries, recorded oral traditions, and more contemporary documents, including children’s literature and curriculum materials. Particular attention will be paid to content, orthographies, grammatical changes and historical and contemporary uses for the texts. Students will also gain experience writing short essays in the Cree language.

NEHI 548 Cree Syntax
3 credits
Reading, research and discussion on topics regarding Cree syntax.

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PSYC 101 Psychology as a Natural Science
3 credits
This course introduces the basic principles underlying the broad areas of psychology, including the biological basis of behavior, sensation and protection, learning, memory, and condition. Specific topics covered include the brain, sleep, drugs, variations in consciousness, touch, taste, smell, hearing, seeing, attention, visual perception, emotion, Pavlov Ian conditioning, operant conditioning, memory and hypnosis.

PSYC 102 General Psychology
3 credits
This course provides an introduction to the behavioral areas of study such as maturation and development, personality, and social relationships. Specific topics covered include intelligence and psychological testing, motivation and emotion, human development, personality, stress and health, psychological disorders, psychotherapy and social behavior.
PSYC 200 Human Development Across the Lifespan
3 credits
Human development across the Lifespan covers development from infancy, childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. Each of these developmental periods is examined with focus on the theories and principles of physical growth, cognition, emotional development, personality, learning, intelligence, and social relationships. An integration of the developmental theories and principles will be applied to the experiences of social and healthcare professionals. This course will benefit those who wish to work in the helping professions or those who want to gain a richer understanding of how development impacts lives. For more detail, please see module objectives. Course structure will be based on research an development on adult learning at the post-secondary level with cultural learning considerations.
Prerequisite: An introductory social work course (SWK 100) and an introductory psychology course (PSYC 101 or 102) are required.

PSYC 269 Introductions to Learning
3 credits
A survey of the field of learning including a consideration of classical conditioning, instrumental learning, and observational learning. In our everyday life there is a little that we do which does not involve some form of learning. One of the distinct characteristic that separates the so called higher species is that they have a greater and more flexible capacity to learn then those lower on the phylogenetic scale. The main objective of this course is to introduce students to the basic principles underlying classical conditioning and operant conditioning, which are the two prime forms of learning studied psychologists. Students will learn how the principles derived from extensive work with animal subjects can be applied to a wide range of human activities and situations, including drug addiction, controlling our immune systems, and helping patients cope with nausea due to chemotherapy, to name a few. A secondary objective of the course is to introduce the approach to psychotherapy known as behavior modification. Students will learn how the principles they have encountered can be applied in attempts to change problem behaviors.
Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or Instructor’s approval.

PSYC 407 Brains and Behavior
3 credits
Introduction to brain function to sensation, movement, learning, motivation, emotion, memory, attention and cognition. The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the way in which the brain functions to meditate the wide range of behaviors that organisms show. Students will learn the basic mechanisms involved in neural function, as well as the anatomy of the main structures in the brain. At the end of the course they should be able to identify the role of different brain structures in specific behavior systems of organisms.
Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or Instructor’s approval.

PSYC 431 Abnormal Psychology
3 credits
This course is designed to familiarize students with the concepts and approaches, which currently are used in the study of abnormal behavior. Students are required to think critically and analytically about the various hypotheses proposed to account for behavior, which is deemed to be abnormal. This will include examining the models that have been proposed to identify or classify behavior as abnormal in the first place. As such the primary goal of the course is to induce the student to evaluate the logic and evidence pertaining to the various theoretical perspectives on the issue raised in the course. Students are also encouraged to consider the influence that a researcher’s own perspective exerts on her or his theories. Students will quickly that answers, which satisfy are few, while questions, which engage the mind are plentiful.
Prerequisite: Psychology 101 or Instructor’s approval.

PSYC 494 Counseling Children and Adolescents
3 credits
This course seeks to further develop counseling skills specific to working with children and adolescents. Developmental issues, counseling theory, and practical application ( via role working) will be covered considering the unique needs of youth. This course will benefit for those who wish to work with children & adolescents either in supportive or counseling roles. For more detail, please see module objectives. Course structure will be based on research and development on adult learning at the post-secondary level with cultural learning considerations.
Prerequisite: Introduction to the Process of Counseling (AU Psyc 488 or equivalent) and an introductory psychology course (Psyc 101 or 102) are required. Adolescents or Child Development (AU Psyc 350 or U of A Psyc 3XX) is also recommended.

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SOCI 100 Introductions to Sociology
3 credits
Sociology100 introduces the student to the specific study of society. The course covers standard introductory topics including gender, class, ethnicity, social theory, scientific methodology, etc.

SOCI 300 Inequality and Social Stratification
3 credits
This course examines inequality in our society. Inequality and stratification is a root concern of sociology. In fact, sociology got started out of concern from the inequality and suffering engendered by the social upheaval that attended the industrial revolution. This course takes a critical look at stratification in our society and examines the theories and justification used to explain and/or support inequality in our society.
Prerequisite: SOCI 100 is recommended.

SOCI 368 Ethnic Relations
3 credits
This course examines racism, racial inequality and ethnic relations in Canadian society, inequality in our society. Despite that some may think, Canada is not the utopian ethnic mosaic many believe it is. Racism, hatred, prejudice, and discrimination are basic features of life for Canada’s ethnic and visible minorities. The course takes a critical look at the ethnic relations in Canada. Special attention is given to the history of colonization and racism and their ongoing impact on Canada’s First Nation people.
Prerequisite: SOCI 100 is recommended.

SOCI 400 Grief & Loss – Understanding the Nature of Grief & Loss
3 credits
This course seeks to expand our understanding of bereavement, grief, and mourning in the context of a multi-cultural family life cycle perspective. As such the nature of loss (e.g. anticipated vs. unanticipated), the impact of loss on family members, and the psycho-social factors influencing the experience of loss are explored as processes that can provide opportunities for personal growth or as processes that can polarize family members. This understanding of loss and its impact on self/ family/ community will be facilitated on a theoretical as well as personal level as students will be expected to explore their own responses to loss in their lives.
Prerequisite: FAM 300 & FAM 350.

SSL 100 Leadership Prep & Study Skills
3 credits
This course is offered as a module in the first week with continuing weekly sessions throughout the introductory term, and invites students to build basic skills in learning including an understanding of the cultural protocols practiced in the program, an introduction to learning styles and strategies, reading for comprehension, organizing and researching papers, exploring the relationship with math, and managing life as a student.

SWK 100 Introductions to Social Work
3 credits
This course provides students with opportunity to explore the nature of the traditional Indigenous helping practices and to become familiar with the history and development of Western social work. Students are introduced to the philosophical foundations of both Indigenous methods and Western approaches through class discussions, readings, guest speakers and assignments. They investigate how their future works in human services. Students also explore the broad scope of social work practice and learn about the many roles that social workers may assume within their practice.

SWK 110 Cree Identity and World View
3 credits
This course, partially conducted in Cree, will focus on the pre-contact and post-contact history of the Cree people. This course is intended to assist students in gaining a deeper understanding of themselves as members of the Cree Nation. We will explore the cultural and social past of the Cree people through linguistic, oral, visual, and written documentation. This course will also rely on oral traditions told by visiting Elders. Texts used for the course will be materials written in the language, both manuscript and published sources. While material, pictorial, and taped collections in local repositories will provide some of the resources, students are required to seek out their own primary sources of information such as elders and undocumented materials.

SWK 141 First Year Practicum (300 hours)
6 credits
Field placement integrates knowledge with practice as students are required to experience social work settings within their communities. This allows them to develop a work ethnic and practice skills based on social work values and ethnics. This is a supervised learning opportunity and is combined with seminars designed to integrate, emotional and professional development.

SWK 200 Interpersonal Communication
3 credits
This two part course introduces students to more effective ways of communicating with significant others (co-workers, family members, etc…). In Part 1, which emphasizes self-exploration and self change, students will learn how their present style of communication inhibits the communication process while also learning more effective communication strategies. In Part 2, which emphasizes generic interviewing skills, students will learn each of the components associated with the interview process by reading about the skill, seeing a model of the skill in action, practicing the skill, and generalizing the concepts of the training sessions in their daily interactions.

SWK 205 Counseling: Generalist Perspective
3 credits
This course provides an opportunity for students to deepen their understandings of themselves while simultaneously increasing their counseling skills. The course will explore our “use of self” as practitioners and will investigate the theoretical foundations and techniques guiding counseling practice. Comparisons will be drawn to traditional First Nations’ healing practices as students will be encouraged to think analytically about their own development, how they been influenced and how they can integrate their life experiences and counseling methodology to form the foundations of a counseling practice. This course also provides opportunities for students to gain some applied skills in interviewing, client assessment and practice counseling sessions.

SWK 210 Introductions to Social Policy
3 credits
This course explores the form and function of social policies in Canada with particular emphasis on how social policy is developed, the interests and tensions that influence policy and the relationship between public policy decisions and outcomes for social programs, practitioners and clients. Students will be encouraged to research social policy as evidenced in the local context and to critically examine how communities are affected by federal and provincial policy developments.

SWK 215 Social Issues: Understanding Addictions
3 credits
Indigenous and western perspectives are considered in examining various types of addictive and abusive behaviors including substance abuse and gambling and its impact on individuals, families and communities. Students will understand the process of addiction as well as the process and stages of change and recovery including assessment, treatment and relapse prevention and know the support services that exist. Of particular importance is developing and understanding of the role they can play in prevention, intervention, treatment and aftercare.

SWK 220 Communities Healing & Development
3 credits
This course provides an analysis of social problems often experienced by First Nation communities. Students learn how to social work practitioners may take an active and supportive role in the process of community healing. Topics to be addressed include: impacts of colonization, multi-generation grief & loss, community capacity building, capacity assessments, needs assessments, stages and process of change, and the continuum of relationships from consultation to collaboration. Students will examine the determinants of health and the implications of these for their developing model of social work practice.

SWK 241 Second Year Practicum (400 hours)
6 credits
The second field placement will help students define their interest in a particular field of work or specific skills relevant to the populations they wish to work with. They will then have the option of experiencing direct service delivery in a human services setting, or of collaborating in the design and delivery of a service or research project based on consensus of faculty and peers. While this is a supervised field experiences, students are experience, students are expected to be more self-directed in this program of studies. Integrative seminars are a part of this process.

SWK 300 Practice with Organizations
3 credits
This course offers a number of theoretical orientations to human service organizations and engages them in practical applications for understanding the relational dynamics of organizations. Students will be exposed to both conventional and First Nations Perspectives. In particular, this course will help students understand the ways in which social work professionals demonstrate leadership in organizations.

SWK 320 Practice with Groups
3 credits
Students will develop an understanding of the purpose and use of groups in social work practice. They will understand group dynamics and develop skills to promote effective individual and collective behavior in groups. Knowledge and skills in consensus building and conflict resolution are developed and practiced within group activities.

SWK 350 Family Relationship Development
3 credits
This course explores the nature of intimate relationships from a family systems perspective as well as a psychological perspective. The family systems perspective provides students with a better understanding of the varied relationship patterns (triangles, cut-off, conflict, etc.) that couples/families inherit as relationship templates from prior generations, as well as the process of changing these patterns. Additionally, due to the variety of stresses families are forced to cope with (addictions, divorce, spouse and child abuse, etc.), this course also explores the impact of trauma and addiction on intimate relationships, the healing process that helps transform victims into survivors (a prerequisite to healthier relationships), and the nature of healthy intimate relationships.

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